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Toyota 86: The Fun Police

Proximity Wellington, Toyota New Zealand, 2012

For the exciting launch of the new Toyota 86 sports car, New Zealand’s first shipment was hijacked by a mysterious organisation calling themselves ‘The Fun Police’.

This sparked a nationwide hunt for the missing vehicle that spanned multiple advertising channels – both online and off.

There were already lots of pictures of this much-anticipated car everywhere in international online coverage, so instead of showing a car people already had seen, we decided to take it away.

A three act narrative: Launch, Hijack, Hunt!

The first part of the campaign produced typical billboards, posters, TV ads, and even a website showing off the car. There was also a Facebook page, and an ’86 Club’ Facebook app, with the chance to Win an 86 for 86 days.

In the second part, we hijacked our own ads, using a fictitious organisation called themselves the ‘Fun Police’.

Unable to bear the sight of the thrilling new Toyota 86 (it was too much fun), they hijacked the first shipment of 86s into New Zealand, and censored all the 86 advertising online and in print.

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Censored-86-poster

The third phase empowered the ’86 Club’ audience to get the 86 back by hunting down special ‘Fun Infringement’ codes – which they found on everything the Fun Police censored.

They then entering them into the 86 Club app to gain themselves even more chances to win the 86 for 86 days, unlock achievements and share sightings with other 86 fans.

My involvement

  • I created the Information Architecture and Content Plan for the 86 Website.
  • I designed the Facebook app that fans used to participate in the game and shaped the open graph messages that helped spread the word of the game as it unfolded to players and their friends, encouraging them to keep playing to earn entries and earn achievements.
  • I designed the game component of the campaign, planning where different Fun Police codes could be found and defining their points values to keep the challenge interesting and varied for our audience.
  • I ran the 86 Facebook community in the lead up to the campaign, building a base of sports car fans and identifying particularly keen individuals. When the Fun Police component went live, I monitored both the 86 and Fun Police pages closely, and helped keep players fully engaged with the game.
Documenting the core game mechanics. To earn entries, players could enter found Fun Police codes and share photographs of Fun Police sightings (our hijacked ads).
Documenting the core game mechanics. To earn entries, players could enter found Fun Police codes and share photographs of Fun Police sightings (our hijacked ads).
Describing how people would engage with the campaign via the game on multiple levels: Not everyone would play the game, but those who did would spread awareness to 'onlookers' via open graph messages and other public activity in the game.
Describing how people would engage with the campaign via the game on multiple levels: Not everyone would play the game, but those who did would spread awareness to ‘onlookers’ via open graph messages and other public activity in the game.
Mapping out the scope of the application's functions prior to wireframing.
Mapping out the scope of the application’s functions prior to wireframing.
Wireframes to describe how the code entry form would react to codes as the player typed them in. A lot of effort was put into 'making the app seem a lot smarter than it really is'.
Wireframes to describe how the code entry form would react to codes as the player typed them in. A lot of effort was put into ‘making the app seem a lot smarter than it really is’.
Validation alerts for a suspect code (designed to encourage players to 'try out' new code types and experiment with the system).
Validation alerts for a suspect code (designed to encourage players to ‘try out’ new code types and experiment with the system).

Results

This was my first project working with open graph stories, in the early days of Facebook’s rollout of this feature.

I was particularly pleased with what we learnt as a team about using Facebook’s methods of sharing (instead of our own hacky ones) and the positive, visible impact these had on the overall reach of the campaign.

  • New Facebook fans over the run of the campaign: over 9,000
  • 86 Club application members: 3152
  • ’86 hunt’ game players: 545
  • Total competition entries awarded: 274,483
  • Total number of flags earned by players: 22,102

Screenshots

The 86 Club was created as a place to communicate with the 86 fan community, particularly owners of the car.
The 86 Club was created as a place to communicate with the 86 fan community, particularly owners of the car.
When the Fun Police campaign when live, the 86 Club underwent a "hasty redesign" to let players share information to help find the missing 86s.
When the Fun Police campaign when live, the 86 Club underwent a “hasty redesign” to let players share information to help find the missing 86s.
Players could pick up achievement "flags" for finding particular combinations of Fun Police codes, or answering lead generation questions.
Players could pick up achievement “flags” for finding particular combinations of Fun Police codes, or answering lead generation questions.